Arts & Culture / Mosaic / Theater / September 22, 2008

One-man, many characters

Portraying one character can be difficult enough. However Tim Mooney, actor and playwright, can perform a dozen with ease. He brought his talents to Knox on Sunday, September 21 with both a workshop on the life of Moliere, the renowned 17th century comedian, as well as a one-man show where he performed as a variety of Moliere’s best known characters.

The workshop took place during the afternoon, where Mooney detailed the history of the playwright with his extensive knowledge of the theater icon. It was more than a simple lecture; Mooney supplemented the workshop with audience participation and his own energy, keeping the crowd well engaged. Associate Professor of Theatre, Neil Blackadder, was responsible for bringing Mooney to the stage for these events. For him, the involvement with Moliere this year stems from a culmination of factors ranging from a variation between theatrical styles each year to a unique costuming opportunity to Blackadder simply trying his hand at Moliere’s works. Thus, the choice to bring Mooney here was simple.

Following the workshop, Mooney performed his own one-man show “Moliere Than Thou.” Beginning with Moliere himself, he opened with an apology, claiming the rest of his cast had been food-poisoned and was unable to perform. He proceeded to perform sketches showcasing some of Moliere’s most hilarious characters, from clever servants to jaded noblemen. Like the workshop, the show was also supplemented with audience interaction and was met with definite enthusiasm.

“I thought he embodied each individual character wonderfully, especially in a distinct physical manner,” said junior Devan Cameron.

During his workshop, Mooney had said he wanted to expose the audience to Moliere in a snapshot, and he added, “When Moliere is well-done, the audience connects to the show as they never imagined they could.”

Devinne Stevens


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