International / National / News / April 22, 2010

News Briefs: April 15-21

ST. CLOUD, Minnesota – A laptop computer fell from a helicopter on Saturday night, narrowly missing 10-year-old Grayson Peterka. Peterka was in his backyard at a family barbecue when the laptop fell just feet in front of him. The laptop was left on the helicopter’s skid before takeoff. Peterka was not injured. (Source: www.hothardware.com)

ICELAND – The eruption of the Eyjafjallajökull volcano in Iceland has caused the cancellation of 100,000 flights and cost the world’s airlines an estimated $1.7 billion. Ash from the volcano’s eruption made airspace unsafe to navigate, leaving most European citizens grounded. The volcano began to erupt March 20 followed by a larger eruption beginning April 14. Ash from the volcano is not expected to reach the Americas. As of Wednesday, Germany, France and the U.K. reopened their airspace estimating that more than three-fourths of the continent’s air traffic was back in the sky. (Source: www.washingtonpost.com)

BEIJING, China – Wednesday, April 21 was declared a national day of mourning in China in honor of the 2,064 killed in the 6.9 magnitude earthquake that struck rural Yushu County in western Qinghai province on Wednesday, April, 14. The earthquake left more than 12,100 injured. (Source: www.cnn.com)

ROME, Italy – Pope Benedict XVI made his first public comments on the Catholic clergy abuse scandal in over a month after meeting with abuse victims. The Vatican said Sunday, April 18 that Benedict feels shame for what the victims suffered within the church and that their abusers would be brought to justice. The Catholic church has been shaken by hundreds of allegations of abuse in the past year. (Source: www.cnn.com)

PHOENIX, Arizona – A bill passed through the Arizona legislature this week that would grant state and local police broader powers to enforce immigration. Governor Jan Brewer (R) has yet to sign the bill into law, but the bill has divided citizens and police groups, who fear that it may lead to ethnic and racial profiling as well as threatening public safety by discouraging immigrants from reporting crimes or cooperating with authorities for fear of being deported. (Source: www.nytimes.com)

Sarah Colangelo


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