Arts & Culture / Dance / Mosaic / November 18, 2010

Terp’s Separation Anxiety

The fall performance of Terpsichore Dance Collective entitled “Separation Anxiety” featured movement set to poetry, Charlie Brown-like antics and brought YouTube to the stage of Harbach Theatre last Friday and Saturday.

The first dance of “Separation Anxiety” was “Suspicion,” choreographed by senior Chalia Bellis to “Queen of the Lot” by The Queen Standards. The three dancers, seniors Bellis and Katie Nellett and freshman Kelsey Cullum, would often mirror each other in their steps and positions, moving with a second lapsing between each other. The dance started slow and got a bit livelier toward the end.

In “Closing the Chapter,” junior Christian Lewis choreographed a piece that was dedicated to those who have relationships that sap away their energy and “who are finally regaining strength to move on with their lives before it destroys them.” Set to “Energy” by Keri Hilson, Lewis’ dance featured pushing and pulling movements which illustrate those draining relationships mentioned in the comments of the program. Dancers lined up in a column and then dropped out of the line. During the song they would stop to pause after little movements. Their dance received loud applause at the end.

As a five-part dance which acted as interludes between the longer dances, “Dust [duhst]” was “an exploration of movement as a companion to text,” choreographed by sophomore Kate LaRose and the dancers. During the first part of this dance, “2 a cloud of finely powdered earth or other matter in the air,” dancers came out in pajamas while sophomore Avery Wigglesworth sat on the front of stage reading a book. For each part of the dance, dancers sat and read “poetry they wrote collectively” from the book as they moved, “inspired by specific word definitions.”

During “Machines Were Breathing” by junior Rachel Clark, dancers dressed in all black and moved slowly as they danced in five pairs to “Close to You” by Josefine Cronholm. In the center was the dancing pair of senior Shruti Patel and senior Cody Dailey. As Patel slammed down, away from her partner, the pairs disintegrated while Patel and Dailey stood on the front of the stage as the rest of the dancers stopped with the music and sat down. Cutting to “Prelude 12/21” by AFI, the atmosphere changed with the driving beat of the song. Dancers covered their eyes with their hands during the line “kiss my eyes and lay me to sleep.” Forming a block in the corner, dancers moved line by line from the group and collapsed on top of each other.

During “Machines Were Breathing” by junior Rachel Clark, dancers dressed in all black and moved slowly as they danced in five pairs to “Close to You” by Josefine Cronholm. In the center was the dancing pair of senior Shruti Patel and senior Cody Dailey. As Patel slammed down, away from her partner, the pairs disintegrated while Patel and Dailey stood on the front of the stage as the rest of the dancers stopped with the music and sat down. Cutting to “Prelude 12/21” by AFI, the atmosphere changed with the driving beat of the song. Dancers covered their eyes with their hands during the line “kiss my eyes and lay me to sleep.” Forming a block in the corner, dancers moved line by line from the group and collapsed on top of each other.

The “Point of Contact” by Nellett and dancers featured juniors Brynn Ogilvie and Jamie White. The piece began with the sound of thunder and rain as Ogilvie tossed and turned as if she was having a nightmare, with White dancing near but not acknowledging him. With Ogilvie frightened, “Tula Baba” by London Studio Orchestra & Singers began and soon Ogilvie and White danced the same moves. They would twirl and move independent of each other until they finally danced with each other. Ogilvie and White would interchange soft movements with abrupt ones and hugged at end, rocking back and forth.

Before senior Lauren Scott’s dance “Circle Yes or No” began, junior Spencer Graham stepped onto the stage, carrying a mini piano reminiscent of the piano-playing Peanuts character Schroeder and sat in the corner. With five dancers in summer dresses, the first song “Christmas Time is Here (Instrumental) by the Vince Guaraldi Trio began with Graham pretending to play along with the song on his piano. “Hold It In” by Jukebox the Ghost kicked in and inspired the dancers to move with the upbeat, piano rock. Their facial expressions brought much to the personality of the dance as they smiled and acted surprise throughout the dance. As the song is about a girl finding out a guy likes her because he “can’t hold it in,” the dancers acted coy, like they were excited for a date. They were flirty, curtsying and teasing the audience by briefly lifting up their dresses to reveal their shorts.

For the piano break, Graham came back on stage with the piano and played with the song, inciting laughter from the audience. Taking the Charlie Brown reference “Good grief!” from the song and running with it, at the end sophomore Amanda Goslawski played Lucy to Kelsey Witzling’s Charlie Brown as Witzling leaped toward Goslawski’s football and fell to the ground.

“‘Circle Yes or No’ was really cute. The song was great too,” freshman Mydel Santos said.

“You Know What I Mean” began with a red light on the dancers. Dancing to “Feeling Good” by Michael Buble in sparkly and frilly dresses with some reminiscent of the days of flappers in the 20s, the dancers would dance seductively, moving their hips. They moved together in a line and shimmied down. They strutted and quickly stepped to front and ended with poses.

In a new format and approach to dance, junior Brandon Paraharm brought YouTube to the dance floor in his piece called “Digital Draftings.” Preceding the dance was an improvised skit by Joey Firman, ’10, who played the role of a stressed out college student who gets a much needed break from senior Diana Razo who showed him YouTube videos on her laptop near the front of the stage. At the same time as Firman and Razo watched the Youtube videos, dancers would dance to four different songs with Paraharm playing the persona of B. Avery, a YouTube choreographer who recorded those dances as tutorials.

The first dance was to “Secrets” by OneRepublic, which featured soft and graceful movements. The second dance had a different atmosphere, as it was set to “Sex On My Money (ft. Gucci Mane)” by John Brown and the dancers moved sensually in high heels with the audience catcalling them. The third dance featured a more hardened feel to it as dancers wore hats and baggy pants. While they would dance, they would stop and pause as the YouTube video would buffer because of the Internet connection of Knox. Firman yelled out, “Dude, Knox wireless sucks!” with the audience laughing raucously. At the end, Paraharm danced solo and impressed the audience with his fast footwork and precise movements and overall good showmanship. He ended giving the peace sign and walked off the stage to a thunderous applause.

“P.S. I Love You” by Shruti Patel began with the soft piano intro to “Bloodstream” by Stateless. The dancers moved slowly and with emotion to the music. The dance synched well with the music as the piano kept a steady beat for the dancers. Their movements seemed heavy with thought at times and expressed a longing as dancers would move with each other.

In “Individualized Collected Empowerment” by sophomore Jenny Linder, dancing to a quick tempo to Beyonce’s “Get Me Bodied,” dancers would line in twos and featured solos from the individual dancers.

“They All Fell, But Only Some Found Enlightenment On the Pavement Below” by White was dynamic as the stylings of the dance changed with the song, transitioning from “Intro” by The XX into “That Home” by The Cinematic Orchestra. Near the end of the second song, dancers would speed up with each move and do various isolations of their body. Dancers used all of the stage and their moves were exciting and entertaining to watch.

Sheena Leano


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