Restricted fund guidelines passed

The Knox College Student senate held its weekly meeting In the Round Room of the Ford Center for Fine Arts (CFA) last Thursday, Feb. 24, primarily to discuss spending guidelines proposed by the Special Meeting on Use of the Restricted Fund (SMURF).

Presenting provisionary clauses, members of SMURF outlined three main goals: to establish a $50,000 contingency fund to be used in the event that under-enrollment impacts club budgets, a short-term purchasing phase and a long-term phase that sets aside all money not used in the previous two phases to be designated as the “Student Lounge Activity Fund.”

“We wanted to be explicit to make the commitment to be in the charge of the lounge,” Senate Treasurer and junior Gordon Barrat said in response to questions on the long-term use of funds.

Based on a survey previously responded to by the student body, the short-term projects were set to be focused on increased fitness center activities, equipment and resources for the soon-to-be refurbished Seymour Union Student Lounge (formerly Wallace Lounge), composting machinery, extra seating (indoor and outdoor) around campus and fixing the fireplace in the Gizmo. A new counselor for the Counseling Center came in at a close sixth in the survey and, in the event that any of the previous projects were to be found unfeasible, it would be substituted.

After approximately half an hour of discussion, the chamber voted to approve the provisional guidelines and an alternate clause for the long-term phase, with suggestions made to improve the language used overall.

In addition, Residential Quality of Life Chair Katie Wrenn, a sophomore, announced the selection of Special Interest Housing candidates, with a housing fair to be held in the Lincoln Room on March 2 from 8:15 to 9:30 p.m.

Student Senate holds weekly open meetings at 7 p.m. in CFA.

Andrew Polk


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