Arts & Culture / Mosaic / April 24, 2013

Dressing for an inconsistent spring

Freshman Carly Berinstein dresses in layers to cope with the constantly changing spring weather. (Casey Mendoza/TKS)

Freshman Carly Berinstein dresses in layers to cope with the constantly changing spring weather. (Casey Mendoza/TKS)

Despite it being over a month into spring, the Midwest has still seen days of gloom, thunderstorms and even snow.

The weather has been consistently inconsistent and every day has the potential for sun, cold and always rain. This plays a role in how Knox students decide to dress.

“I just think it’s annoying when I wake up and have to dress for both 9 in the morning and noon,” freshman Brya Johnson said. “Mother Nature can be pretty misleading.”

Knox students have decidedly seen enough of winter this year, and many are more than ready to sit outside and enjoy the sun.

“Knox is just a happier place when it’s spring,” freshman Tariro Nussinov said. “Everyone’s just happier and sitting outside and wearing bright tones and colors, and it can get pretty depressing when you have to wake up and put on pants.”

A popular approach to the ever-changing weather is layering.

“I usually just dress in layers ,because you can take them off and put them back on again. You may not look good, but you’ve got to try,” freshman Morgan Tonner said.

Many students, however, have decided to simply dress for spring, regardless of the potentially cold weather.
“I look at my closet in the morning and say ‘I want to wear this today.’ I’m very optimistic when I get dressed, and it hasn’t been terrible,” freshman Carly Berinstein said.

“I just plan for the afternoon weather. I’m just always cold in the morning,” freshman Timmy Connor said.
Students also worry about the consistent chance of rain.

“That’s a struggle, too,” Nussinov said. “When in doubt, wear a dress and just carry an umbrella.”

Despite the substantial amount of rain Knox has seen in the last few weeks, many students appear unfazed by it.

“I try to stay inside, but the big thunderclouds are just so great. You really have to just make the best of it,” sophomore Forrest Linsell said.

Many students agreed with this statement.

“You get wet. You get to the point where you realize there’s nothing better than the feeling of just getting home and drying off,” Tonner said.

Despite an apparent optimism and readiness for spring, many students are waiting for spring to actually come.

“I have a pair of shorts that I’m saving for when it actually gets warm,” sophomore Shannon Henry said.
When it finally does get warmer, students seem to have a good idea of what they will be wearing.

“I brought this floor length floral skirt that I’m holding off wearing, but I’m really excited about it,” Berinstein said.
Students have expressed their excitement for “real” spring weather and are anxiously awaiting its arrival.

“I’m waiting,” Nussinov said. “If you dress for spring, spring will come.”

Kate Mishkin
Kate Mishkin is a senior majoring in English literature and minoring in journalism. She started working for TKS as a freshman and subsequently served as managing editor, co-news editor and co-mosaic editor. Kate is the recipient of four awards from the Illinois College Press Association for news and feature stories and one award from the Associated Collegiate Press. She won the Theodore Hazen Kimble Prize in 2015 and 2014 and the Ida M. Tarbell Prize in Investigate Journalism in 2014. She has interned at FILTER Magazine, the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette and WGIL radio and the Virginian-Pilot.

Twitter: @KateMishkin

Tags:  carly berinstein cold fashion Shannon Henry spring Tariro Nussinov Timmy Connor weather

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Kate Mishkin
Kate Mishkin is a senior majoring in English literature and minoring in journalism. She started working for TKS as a freshman and subsequently served as managing editor, co-news editor and co-mosaic editor. Kate is the recipient of four awards from the Illinois College Press Association for news and feature stories and one award from the Associated Collegiate Press. She won the Theodore Hazen Kimble Prize in 2015 and 2014 and the Ida M. Tarbell Prize in Investigate Journalism in 2014. She has interned at FILTER Magazine, the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette and WGIL radio and the Virginian-Pilot. Twitter: @KateMishkin




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