Arts & Culture / Mosaic / November 13, 2013

Feminist event brings together activism, art

Homemade crafts and art were featured and sold by students from SASS, WVKC, Zine Club, Alliance for Peaceful Action, Sigma Chi and Common Ground during the Feminist DIY Fest Saturday, Nov. 10 in the Gizmo. (Casey Mendoza/TKS)

Homemade crafts and art were featured and sold by students from SASS, WVKC, Zine Club, Alliance for Peaceful Action, Sigma Chi and Common Ground during the Feminist DIY Fest Saturday, Nov. 10 in the Gizmo. (Casey Mendoza/TKS)

The Gizmo was taken over by handmade creations and female-fronted punk rock bands on Saturday, Nov. 10. This was the Feminist DIY Fest, hosted by Students Against Sexism in Society, Sigma Chi, Common Ground, WVKC, Allies for Peaceful Alliance and Zine Club.

The student organizations hosted three punk rock bands at their event: This is the Enemy, Rat Storm and Anomaly. Originating in Bloomington, Ind. under the leadership of Professor Nathalie Haurberg, Rat Storm has been a band for five years now. This is the Enemy got its start in August of last year in Indianapolis.

“When doing something, DIY is always the best way to do it,” said Usman of This is the Enemy.

Usman is a big fan of DIY and was also very pleased to see politics present on campus, especially among young people.

Zine Club’s table seemed to be a particular success during the festival. Zine, a mini-magazine, is put together during their meetings on Tuesdays in the Radio Room of GDH. This first edition features some of club member sophomore Brendan Carmack’s pictures of his unfinished rap lyrics. Carmack was a fan of punk rock in middle school and was interested to see who would be performing at the festival.

Sophomore and co-president of Zine Club Carolyn Dussault would like to see another event like this happen in the future.

“Out of all the bands that are here, I was interested most in Rat Storm since one of its members is a teacher here at Knox,” she said.

Junior and SASS Co-President Hadley Gephart offered insight into the festival’s origins, explaining that Haurberg approached her with the idea of  an event to help support SASS. The two decided to highlight feminism in the punk rock music industry, with the DIY theme tying in to display the many creations that students on campus have come up with.

As SASS members began to discuss the plans, they spread the word to the other organizations they were affiliated with, thus sparking interest from the other groups collaborating.

Gephart wanted the Knox community to gain more exposure to feminist and political music and to have a visual presence of feminism as it relates to DIY culture on campus.

“I hope that this event will draw people from different groups across campus because I think that it is very valuable to engage in conversation with people who are drawn to the festival for different reasons,” she said.

The event’s planners viewed it as a success, due to the large turnout and array of DIY craft tables.

“It’s so great to see such a positive response to an event that highlights the talents and skills of people in our community. Now that we’ve seen what it looks like when we support each other and bring all of our various areas of interest together for a common cause, I’m very excited to explore more opportunities like this in the future,” said Gephart.

Angela McNeal

Tags:  anomaly community crafts culture DIY feminist Festival nathalie haurberg rat storm SASS this is the enemy Zine Club

Bookmark and Share




Previous Post
Skrade aims to green campus
Next Post
Independent study focuses on costumes, culture



Angela McNeal




You might also like






More Story
Skrade aims to green campus
Paul Skrade joined Knox College on Wednesday, Oct. 23 as interim sustainability coordinator. He replaces the outgoing...