Mosaic / Reviews / October 22, 2014

Slash’s “World on Fire” reinvents classic rock

Web Slash graphicWith this follow-up to 2012 “Apocalyptic Love,” Slash and his cohorts have put together a staggering 17-strong track list with a little something for everybody. While it lacks the more frenzied riffs prominent in the Guns songbook, it is heavier than “Apocalyptic Love.” It elicits the perfect blend of involuntary head-banging and foot-tapping from its listeners, proving itself a calmer perspective on hard rock music. The band is finally coming into its own, finding its sound and cementing its place in rock ‘n roll music for years to come. When listened to in chronological order, the album shows that The Conspirators have found their niche and churned out a complete-sounding album. It brings us back to the Slash we know and love, who seemed to have lost his footing back in the days of his self-titled debut album. Slash is accompanied by the astounding vocals of Myles Kennedy, who is no longer “pitchy” but still reminiscent of the Myles we grew to love from Alter Bridge.

Slash recently went on record to refute Gene Simmons’ (KISS) statement on rock being dead, saying that it is very much alive, even though times have changed from when they were getting their start 30-odd years ago. If anything, this album proves just that.

Slash featuring Myles Kennedy and the Conspirators came out with a new album entitled "Slash with Myles Kennedy & The Conspirators: World on Fire" Sept. 10, 2014. (Courtesy of http://goo.gl/ylNPTb)

Slash featuring Myles Kennedy and the Conspirators came out with a new album entitled “Slash with Myles Kennedy & The Conspirators: World on Fire” Sept. 10, 2014. (Courtesy of http://goo.gl/ylNPTb)

Specific tracks to listen to are the title track, “World on Fire,” Ñ also the first on the record, which subsequently sets the tone for the rest of the album Ñ “Shadow Life,” bluesy ballad “Battleground,” instrumental “Safari Inn,” “30 Years to Life,” “Wicked Stone” (whose assured strains toward the end are reminiscent of Guns’ feel-good track “Nightrain”), “The Dissident” and “Avalon.”

Ayla Mir

Tags:  band bands classic Guns n Roses music rock Slash

Bookmark and Share




Previous Post
"Gotham" imaginative look into pre-Batman crime
Next Post
Flix: "π" an exhilarating thriller



Ayla Mir




You might also like






More Story
"Gotham" imaginative look into pre-Batman crime
Christopher Nolan’s reign of shadowed superhero aesthetics has mercifully come to an end. What goes down must come back...