Mosaic / Reviews / March 2, 2016

“Neverwhere” impresses in more ways than one

From the moment I walked into the theater, I could tell this production was going to be something grand. The stage design immediately took my interest due to its superb construction and art. The stairways, the art on the walls, the interweaving of the different doorways and tunnels; it was amazing. This aspect went above and beyond my expectations.

The same can be said for the wardrobe. In each scene, from the bustling city streets to the Earl’s train car, the costume design continued to impress. Some choices were a bit odd, such as the tattoo sleeves, but they didn’t take away from the bigger picture. The gowns were majestic, the suits and ties fitting, and I would especially like to point out the outfits in the market. The scope of this scene was incredible and worthy of its own applause.

Sound, videogrFrom the moment I walked into the theater, I could tell this production was going to be something grand. The stage design immediately took my interest due to its superb construction and art. The stairways, the art on the walls, the interweaving of the different doorways and tunnels; it was amazing. This aspect went above and beyond my expectations.

The same can be said for the wardrobe. In each scene, from the bustling city streets to the Earl’s train car, the costume design continued to impress. Some choices were a bit odd, such as the tattoo sleeves, but they didn’t take away from the bigger picture. The gowns were majestic, the suits and ties fitting, and I would especially like to point out the outfits in the market. The scope of this scene was incredible and worthy of its own applause.

Sound, videography and lighting also contributed a large amount to the production. The sound design and lighting throughout was used in a subtle though remarkable way that added depth to each scene. The same can be said for the small instances of video that aided in exploring the possibilities of this world. I can’t imagine this production working quite as well without it. To all involved in the production, kudos. It was a sight to see.

The show itself opened with a sense of enthusiasm and never slowed down. The transitions between scenes were flawless and the intricacy of the moving parts was impressive. Each actor/actress brought out the most in their roles and had me believing the world they were in. Senior Micah Snow-Cobb was amongst the stars. His confusing and exciting journey throughout London Above and Below was portrayed very well, giving the audience a point of familiarity to cling to. The role was supported by a crew of characters that were cast to perfection. Junior Ian Tully brought a strong yet suspicious flair to the mix, while junior Jordan Hurst brought an eager sense of destiny and leadership.

Of course, none of this story would be possible without the stellar performance by junior Martha Brown, who, in my humble opinion, stole the show. Her caring nature and drive to solve this horrible tragedy never faltered and impressed me thoroughly the whole way through.

The comedic, yet necessary, roles played by sophomore Zak Metalsky and junior Tristan Yi came off a bit exaggerated at times, though consistently served as a break from the serious tone. Even the smaller roles did their jobs well. Junior Trevor Marshall and senior Sammie Zimay gave the office an authentic feel, while senior Holden Meier cracked me up with his creepy nature. I could find fault in few of the performances, though the Black Friars, played by sophomore Michelangelo Pori, sophomore Aidan Murphy and sophomore Ben Rezko, seemed to lack in charm. Perhaps these roles required this, but they did little to captivate the audience as the rest did so well. All of these pieces together made for an excellent ensemble of performances that shined.

The story was imaginative and unique. From the subway, to the flat, to the various settings of London Below, each scene was executed with precision and care. There were few times I was taken out by a missed line or an awkward exchange. Nevertheless, such instances occurred seldomly. The pacing of the story felt even, though the second half dragged on a bit at times. The ending scene (which I will exclude to save you from spoilers) was brilliant and wrapped up a chaotic story quite nicely. Overall, the adaptation was delivered well and did very little to hold itself back.

“Neverwhere” was a treat. Never before have I seen a production at the college level pull off such a feat in its construction and design. Each aspect was polished and tuned to a glorious level, and the hard work these students have brought forth was rewarding. This was a real winner.

aphy and lighting also contributed a large amount to the production. The sound design and lighting throughout was used in a subtle though remarkable way that added depth to each scene. The same can be said for the small instances of video that aided in exploring the possibilities of this world. I can’t imagine this production working quite as well without it. To all involved in the production, kudos. It was a sight to see.

The show itself opened with a sense of enthusiasm and never slowed down. The transitions between scenes were flawless and the intricacy of the moving parts was impressive. Each actor/actress brought out the most in their roles and had me believing the world they were in. Senior Micah Snow-Cobb was amongst the stars. His confusing and exciting journey throughout London Above and Below was portrayed very well, giving the audience a point of familiarity to cling to. The role was supported by a crew of characters that were cast to perfection. Junior Ian Tully brought a strong yet suspicious flair to the mix, while junior Jordan Hurst brought an eager sense of destiny and leadership.

Of course, none of this story would be possible without the stellar performance by junior Martha Brown, who, in my humble opinion, stole the show. Her caring nature and drive to solve this horrible tragedy never faltered and impressed me thoroughly the whole way through.

The comedic, yet necessary, roles played by sophomore Zak Metalsky and junior Tristan Yi came off a bit exaggerated at times, though consistently served as a break from the serious tone. Even the smaller roles did their jobs well. Junior Trevor Marshall and senior Sammie Zimay gave the office an authentic feel, while senior Holden Meier cracked me up with his creepy nature. I could find fault in few of the performances, though the Black Friars, played by sophomore Michelangelo Pori, sophomore Aidan Murphy and sophomore Ben Rezko, seemed to lack in charm. Perhaps these roles required this, but they did little to captivate the audience as the rest did so well. All of these pieces together made for an excellent ensemble of performances that shined.

The story was imaginative and unique. From the subway, to the flat, to the various settings of London Below, each scene was executed with precision and care. There were few times I was taken out by a missed line or an awkward exchange. Nevertheless, such instances occurred seldomly. The pacing of the story felt even, though the second half dragged on a bit at times. The ending scene (which I will exclude to save you from spoilers) was brilliant and wrapped up a chaotic story quite nicely. Overall, the adaptation was delivered well and did very little to hold itself back.

“Neverwhere” was a treat. Never before have I seen a production at the college level pull off such a feat in its construction and design. Each aspect was polished and tuned to a glorious level, and the hard work these students have brought forth was rewarding. This was a real winner.

 

Mitch Prentice, Mosaic Editor

Tags:  neverwhere rep term theatre

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